In one of our trips around Peru we heard the story about what happened on the journey taken from Cajamarca to the Celendin province. It’s said that there’s a huge prairie where a cylinder-shaped wall stands and that it extends through the prairie. This wall has the exact shape of a snake, and its head points towards the opposite side of the road.

It is said that back in the times of the Inca Empire a enormous snake would come into Cajamarca destroying everything on its way, but on one of its incursions it was struck by a lightning, dying on the spot.

And so, this is why nowadays that large “wall” of dirt shaped like a snake and the prairie where it’s found it’s called the snake’s prairie.

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