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Yanacocha

// July 18th, 2014 // No Comments » // Legends Peru

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On one of our trips around Peru we were told this legend, it was said that after the Ayacucho battle the Spaniards ran away with all of their treasures, and once close to Huanta in the Rasuhuilca hill they couldn’t go on with so many treasures and before they fell onto the hands of their enemies they opted for throwing them on the lagoon nearby.

It is said that in those times the waters of the lagoon were crystal clear, but with all of the bounties that were thrown it lost its clarity and became known as Yanacocha (dark well).

Along with the bounties, a young man was thrown in the waters and he drowned. And so it is said that at night a golden bull emerges tied with a golden chain, the bull always tries to escape but it can’t because the chain is held by a beautiful mermaid of golden hair.

At midnight, in the middle of the struggle of the bull with the mermaid a voice can be heard saying: I’m a young man that comes to get the treasure but I am trapped turned into a bull, if you break the spell I can still be saved.

Many try to take out the treasure but as soon as they get into the lagoon they disappear forever on its dark waters.

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The Missing Maze Keeper

// July 8th, 2014 // Comments Off // Legends Peru

amazonas tours

There is a legend in the Amazonas department in Peru that tells the story of a young woman that took care of the maze fields, scaring away the parrots so that they wouldn’t eat the cobs.

One day a young man riding a beautiful horse showed up, this man offered to make her his wife and bring riches to her, the young woman accepted and riding the horse they both took off towards the lagoon.

The woman’s father, surprised by his daughter’s absence when to look for her but couldn’t find her. One spring morning the father woke up before early in the morning to move the cattle and saw at the shores of the lagoon a very well dressed lady, and when he come closer he realized it was his daughter, but as soon as she realized her father was there she dove into the lagoon and disappeared.

After he returned to the town he went to the priest and told him what had happened, he told him to bring a rope and to lasso her. And so the father did the next morning, he found his daughter in the same place we had seen her and carefully came closer to her until he could throw the rope and capture her.

The young woman had no choice but to follow his father, he introduced her to the priest, who after saying a prayer, poured holy water on her. The young woman went crazy, and so she was locked in the church but managed to escape and was never found again, it is believed that se returned to the depths of the Pomacocha lagoon.

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The Carrera Hole

// June 24th, 2014 // Comments Off // Legends Peru

carrera

On the road towards Carrera there is a hole in which ancient tales say that a golden calf is hidden, and its dung is also gold, while its saliva is silver.

This calf belonged to a warlock, who kept it on a trunk its whole life, but when the warlock died the calf got out of the trunk where it was kept and hid on the Carrera hole.

To get him out and own it a lot of courage is needed, because a ferocious battle needs to take place with the animal.

For more information on our travel programs click here or ask your travel specialist.

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The Snake’s Prairie

// May 26th, 2014 // Comments Off // Legends Peru

pampa-de-la-culebra

In one of our trips around Peru we heard the story about what happened on the journey taken from Cajamarca to the Celendin province. It’s said that there’s a huge prairie where a cylinder-shaped wall stands and that it extends through the prairie. This wall has the exact shape of a snake, and its head points towards the opposite side of the road.

It is said that back in the times of the Inca Empire a enormous snake would come into Cajamarca destroying everything on its way, but on one of its incursions it was struck by a lightning, dying on the spot.

And so, this is why nowadays that large “wall” of dirt shaped like a snake and the prairie where it’s found it’s called the snake’s prairie.

For more information on our travel programs click here or ask your travel specialist.

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Travel tips for hiking in altitude

// April 28th, 2014 // Comments Off // Travel Tips

Mapi

If you travel around Peru you will need to take in consideration these tips that will help you get properly acclimatized to those high areas of Peru.

If you live on a city at sea level and are traveling to an area that is over 3000 meters high (9842 feet) then most likely the tension in your body’s muscles will rise since they will need to function with less oxygen. This is the reason why it’s very important to take some measures to prepare ourselves physically, especially if we are planning on taking a long hike.

The first thing you need to do before your adventure is to increase your cardiovascular activity. Take up running or try riding with an exercise bike. Cardiovascular training will help your body perform better in high altitude.

Make trial hikes that involve walking uphill as well as downhill, try taking a backpack similar to the one you will be taking along with you during your trip.

For additional exercises you might want to try swimming, or if you regularly go to the gym try to increase the frequency of your training.

Once you are in high altitude the key is to acclimate. Avoid making physical effort the first couple of days, try to get good rest and avoid smoking or having alcoholic drinks.

Nowadays there’s available a wide variety of pills that you will have to take a couple of hours prior traveling and after that every 8 hours. They will allow you to reduce the symptoms of the change in altitude such as headaches, nauseas, exhaustion and sleep disorders.

Additionally, it is recommended eating lightly, especially food that is easy to digest and keep hydrated.

These tips will help you enjoy your trip and stay healthy during your journey.

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The White Heron

// April 7th, 2014 // Comments Off // Legends Peru

garza-blanca

On an Ucayali river tributary used to live a modest married couple that had a daughter and two sons. Blanca (white) which was the girl’s name would always wear a white dress and was very dutiful, reason why her mother loved her very much. Plus, she had the ability to eat any kind of fish with a lot of ease no matter how many bones they may have.

Her siblings hated her so much that agreed between them, with the least bit of remorse, to find a warlock so that they could turn her into a bird.

Indeed, the warlock, taking advantage of the dark night, turned the girl into a beautiful white heron, just like the color of her dress and doomed her to live in the lake and river shores, feeding herself only with fish.

The chama natives of the Ucayali region have a lot of faith in that legend, because when a white heron flies over their huts singing its characteristic sound: cau cau cau, they immediately make their children swallow their saliva so that they won’t choke when eating fish.

It is said that this is why our natives have great ease in eating fish.

Source: Peruvian myths, legends and tales (Jose Maria Arguedas)

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The Capac Ñan

// March 20th, 2014 // Comments Off // Destinations in Peru

 

Capac-Ñam

 

Capac Ñan is the name given to the ancient Inca Trail, although to be more precise, this name does relate to one trail but to a network of trails that add up to around 25,000 kilometers (15,534 miles) of extension.

Its extension could be compare to ten times the journey between Tumbes (furthest northern province of Peru) to Tacna (furthest southern province of Peru) through the Pan-American highway.

Pedro Cieza de Leon, a Spanish soldier that came along with the conquistadors through the main trail of the highlands in 1540 wrote:

“I doubt there’s any record of another trail comparable to this one, crossing deep valleys and rising above the highest mountain and through tons of snow, swamps, rocks and turbulent rivers”.

Cieza de Leon was hallucinating with the magnificent engineering work that had to major roads: the Capac Ñan that went from Cuzco (Peru) to Quito (Ecuador), and another one that made the same journey in parallel along the coast.

A lot of the sections of the Capac Ñan can be done by foot nowadays, on a true journey though the amazing Peruvian geography.

If you would like more information on our travel program click here or ask your travel agent.

Source: Sumaq Magazine.

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